• One School, One Question 2018

    Each year, a committee of students, teachers, and parents chooses one book for the whole school community to read. In the fall, we take half of a school day to discuss the ideas in the book as a school--with guest speakers, discussion groups, and panels. 

    This year we've decided to mix things up a little bit. Instead of a single title, we've chosen a single question, a question we think is especially appropriate this year: 

    What gives us joy?

    To join into the discussion, we’re asking each of you to read one (more if you’re so inclined) of the following works between now and the start of school in September. Each title answers the question in its own way; what gives us joy?:

    Play.

    Under the Lights And In The Dark: Untold Stories of Women’s Soccer by Gwendolyn Oxenham.

    Professional male athletes are among the highest paid and venerated people in our society. Professional women’s soccer players? Not so much. The players profiled in this book fight through harassment, homophobia, poverty and more. Why? They love to play the game.

    Watch Oxenham deliver a TED talk here about her experiences on the pitch. 

    Laughter.

    Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh.

    This is a hilarious graphic memoir based on one of the internet’s most popular blogs. It’s also a frank look at the author’s struggles with depression and suicidal ideation, and how she uses humor to overcome them. Also, there are dogs.

    Watch Brosh here on the Today show. 

     Love.

    The Sun Is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon

    An artistic Korean-American boy meets the love of his life: a mathematically oriented Jamaican girl. The catch? She’s going to be deported tomorrow.

    Watch Yoon's interview about the book at the Miami Book Fair here. 

    Understanding.

    Happier by Tal Ben-Shahar.

    One of Harvard’s most popular professors explains what research has to say about what makes us happy in this accessible, readable piece of non-fiction.

     

    Creating.

    The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo.

    Xiomara is dealing with strict parents and all of the challenges that come with being young and female in her New York neighborhood. She finds her voice and her identity when she discovers the spoken word poetry club at her school in this newly published novel told in verse.

    Watch Acevedo introduce the book here.  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Creating.

    The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo.

    Xiomara is dealing with strict parents and all of the challenges that come with being young and female in her New York neighborhood. She finds her voice and her identity when she discovers the spoken word poetry club at her school in this newly published novel told in verse.